A little conversation with your cranberry?

 

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Avoid the political and sports arguments, and discuss death (yours, theirs) with family on Thursday!

 

All images from our friends at The Conversation Project

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Tibetan Sky Burial, revisited

Previously on this blog, I shared the historical practice of sky burial via Towers of Silence   It’s an ancient practice of body disposal that is not practiced much any longer, but certainly has its own claim to being environmentally conscious and harmonious in a circle-of-life kind of way.

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Recently, blogger and funeral director Caleb Wilde, of Confessions of a Funeral Director, posted a simpler, more modern take on sky burial.

In this sky burial, vultures are still intentionally involved as the disposal method of choice in this series of documentary photographs, but without all the ceremony and planning of the Tower of Silence structure–this burial takes place in an open field, with the vultures doing their work in open sight, much as they would with a dead animal.

The series is fascinating, but also rather graphic, and could be disturbing, so please consider carefully before you click!

Modern Sky Burial

 

So what did you think?!

Recomposition Ahoy!

Y’all know I’m a big believer in The Urban Death Project.  I squee like a fangirl inside when I get to spend time with its founder, Katrina.   Her vision of reclaiming our nutrients is so clear, so full of amazing good energy, so profoundly harmonious with what I want for my body–if you ever get the chance to hear her speak in person, take it.

I backed the Urban Death Project Kickstarter last year, because I believe so strongly in recycling us;   I’m desperately hoping we can get a recomposition center here in Austin once she perfects the design and puts the concept into the wild.

I’m super excited to report that Katrina is now on to phase II of the project, where she and her team have built an actual recomposition silo prototype.

 

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But all this construction and the research opportunities it will create isn’t cheap.

The Urban Death Project has now launched their second crowdfunding appeal, aimed at funding the work being done with the recomposition prototype.

 

 

If you want to see this project succeed, if you want to have real, good options for natural deathcare in cities (not just in areas with lots of open, rural land), NOW IS THE TIME TO BACK YOUR WISHES WITH YOUR WALLETS.

I’m in–I already have.  I love this idea too much.  I want it for you, and for me, and for those I love, to know that the minerals and nutrients that created and sustained them will go on doing that work for another living thing.

Join me!  Donate here.